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What does engine burrying means?
Rahul kapoor
#1
Engines buried in the wing root have minimum parasite drag and probably minimum weight. Their inboard location minimizes the yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust after engine failure. However, they pose a threat to the basic wing structure in the event of a blade or turbine disk failure, make it very difficult to maximize inlet efficiency, and make accessibility for maintenance more difficult. If a larger diameter engine is desired in a later version of the airplane, the entire wing may have to be redesigned. Such installations also eliminate the flap in the region of the engine exhaust, thereby reducing CLmax. 

For all of these reasons, this approach is no longer used, although the first commercial jet, the deHavilland Comet, had wing-root mounted engines. The figure shows Comet 4C ST-AAW of Sudan Airways


Burried engines in the sense engines dont hang or mounted on to the wings rather they are fitted inside the wings...such kind of arrangement you find rarely nowadays as many disadvantages are associated with this..earlier 707s use to come with such arrangements but because of many problems which caused damage to wing attachment structure, depressurisation this design is aborted..but u can still see this kind of arrangement in many modern fighter jets

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