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March 23, 2013 by
Most of the students are unable to stay in Aviation. After the complition of course, it became the toughest task to survive in the field.As it is not a degree course so these unlucky people are still not eligible for govt. exams like banking, railways and other govt firm.whats your opinion for these people...what should they do.. 

September 10, 2012 by
                           Pressure is part of our job   While I was at work the other day a call came from Maintenance Control (MCC). There was a plane headed our way with a #1 engine bleed air issue. We get calls like this all the time and so it was not all that uncommon to have them request that we check it out. The problem came about when they said we HAD to have it fixed in two hours to make a flight to Midway.                                                         A quick check of the history on the #1 engine bleed air system revealed that it had a 45 day history of problems! In other words this bleed air system has been acting up for over a month now and they wanted it fixed in two hours. I thought it was pretty ballsy of them to say we had to get it done, and I let the lead know how I felt about it. Luckily that day we had a guy on shift who is really good with engines and engine systems. He was able to figure out what was wrong and kick the plane out in about an hour and a half. Anyone who has worked on engine bleed air faults knows that often times multiple high power runs are required to narrow down and fix a problem.Part of the issue is that the 737-800 is using the same bleed air valves and regulators as the 737-400 series. These valves seem to work well on the -400 engines (CFM-56-3) and are pretty reliable. These same components are not very reliable on the -800 engines (CFM-56-7). Boeing has not figured out why this is so, or at least they are not saying publicly why this is so. Through the grapevine we have heard that the -800 engines put out a different harmonic vibration than the older engines and this small vib is playing havoc with the components. Whatever it is they are still working on a fix!More troubling is the "you have to get it fixed" statement. There is no way that I have to fix anything in an allotted time period. Make sure that you as an AME / Technician do not fall into this trap. Pressure is part of the job as I have mentioned before, however, when a component has a bunch of history, going back a lot of days, with a lot of different AME'S / Technicians and parts thrown at it, proceed with caution. Do not let Maintenance Control or any one tell you how quickly you should work. In my example it all worked out fine but it could have easily gone the other way with the plane grounded and not leaving until the next morning. Thank God we had Dark Cloud there to work it (yes that is what we call him).  

July 5, 2012 by
In my opinion DGCA should start an All INDIA level examination for the students who want to do AME course , by this way DGCA can maintain the quality of students & studies . All the colleges approved by DGCA will be fulfilled only through this exam , no management quota should be allowed to any college. There are a number of All INDIA level examinations conducted by various organizations like IIT , AIEEE , CAT etc. , Dgca can start an examination a similar one like these organizations do. DGCA should itself make the paper for the entrance exam , if passed student will be alloted a RANK & according to it students can apply to various colleges or there should be a college selection round like UPTU . There should be a fixed fees for the exam & all the colleges should have same fees structure .

September 2, 2012 by
There are people who find no glamour in being an aircraft technician. There are people who really dislike being aircraft mechanics. As a matter of fact those people most likely outnumber the ones that do. Every now and then you find a guy who enjoys what he does and can also see beauty in an otherwise drab dingy job. When one of our member emailed me this pic I said to myself "here is a guy with talent". This pic is beautiful!                 I already can tell he not only enjoys his job but he can also find beauty in a not so easy task such as changing an engine. Takes talent!                    

June 7, 2012 by
It is targeted towards new mechanics entering the field.  Feel free to add more in the comments. Thanks and I always value your responses!  Know your aircraft. Read the technical manuals. Read the theory of operations when you get downtime. You will probably never know EVERYTHING there is to know about your assigned airplane but that is no excuse not to learn about it. If you have to borrow a tool from another mechanic more that twice, go out and buy that tool. Never go into another mechanic's tool box without permission. If you loose a tool, report it immediately to avoid the wrath from management. If you break another mechanic's tool, replace is as soon as practical. Check your ego at the door. There will be times that you will be wrong. Accept it. Safety has to be bigger than your ego. This is a humbling career. If you need help, ask for it. Keep a positive attitude Ditch the grudge against pilots. This industry has its fair share of old salty aircraft mechanics, do not be one of them. Always act and look professional. Always be willing to help your fellow mechanics. Always be willing to learn something new. It keeps you fresh.  Above all else, Don't be a hero, be safe.   1. Never stop learning Learning new things is what makes this industry fresh and exciting. There is always something new to learn. One great way to learn new things is to work with different aircraft mechanics at your job. Never turn down an opportunity to take a factory training course. These courses not only teach aircraft mechanics important skills but also look great on the resume. 2. Learn to troubleshoot Troubleshooting is a skill that takes years to master. Sometimes it is nothing more than making educated guesses based on past experiences. In many cases the troubleshooting guides in the book offer little help. This is were understanding your aircraft and its systems are important.  Troubleshooting an aircraft system is a great way to learn how it all works in detail. Don’t be afraid to tackle a complex problem just because you don’t yet understand the system in question. The maintenance manual theory of operation is a great place to start. 3. Enjoy aviation If you became an aircraft maintenance technician for the money, I feel sorry for you. That’s not to say you cannot make lots of money in this career, but you will probably find yourself frustrated way before you find a big financial payoff. People who are successful in this industry generally have a love of aviation. More so than not, they probably grew up loving airplanes.  So if airplanes are a bore, you picked the wrong career.   4. Learn to work well with others Working well with others comes natural for some and others it takes a little more effort. If you constantly find yourself in arguments with the ones you work with, just sit back and think for a minute, maybe the problem is you and not everyone else. Learn to listen to others. The safest work environment is one in which we can disagree without getting someones feelings hurt. Just be nice, smile more often. 5. Know the Regulations This industry is heavily regulated. That is no secret.  Take time to read the FARs/CAR/JAR Documents and get comfortable with the various sections.  This also pertains to company policies.  Many companies operate under a General Operating Manual,  General Maintenance Manual or General Practices Procedures. These policies are considered law when it comes to the FAA/EASA/DGCA so following them is important. 6. Leave your ego at the door This may come as a surprise to you, but there will come a time in your career that you will be wrong about something. Accept it and learn from it.  Nobody knows everything and if someone claims that they do, be very cautious. If you are proven wrong about something, do not take it personally. Know there difference between  arrogant and confident. 7. Learn to slow down Rushing a job can lead to mistakes. Successful aircraft mechanics have learned over the years that you cannot rush perfection.   Habits Define Us Make these skills habit and you will now doubt become on valuable aircraft mechanic.  Our habits at work and home is how we are defined whether for good or bad. Make becoming a successful  aircraft mechanic your goal and you will not only benefit financially but also with an increased confidence.

July 4, 2012 by
WHO SPOIL OUR FEILD?AS U KNW AFTER FINISHING COURSE WE HAV 2 WRK UNPAID OR WE GET VRY LITTLE AMOUNT OF SALARY? AS IN OTHER FEILD EVEN STIPEND IS VRY MUCH HIGER THEN OUR STARTING SALARY THEN WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS??1)OUR SENIORS- DEY WERE READY TO WRK UNPAID,2)GOVERNMENT OF INDIA 3) AME SCHOOLS 4) GOVT & PRIVATE AIRLINES(ORGANISATION) 5) DGCA 6)PLS WRITE YOUR COMMENT............ IN MY OPINION ITS DGCA BCOZ EVERY YEAR DEY R GIVING APPROVAL 2 NEW INSTITUTES WHICH IS NT GOOD BCOZ ALREADY SO MANY INSTITUTES IN INDIA & EVRY YEAR NO OF STUDENTS PASSING FRM THESE INSTITUTES MUCH MORE THEN D REQUIRENT FROM AVIATION FEILD. & SECOND THING EVERY SESSION SO MANY STUDENTS R CLEARING DGCA EXAMS JUS BY READING OLD QUESTIONS MEANS DGCA PAPER PATTERN IS SO DWN LEVEL.... EVERY ONE CAN PASS IF THEY CAN READ OLD QUESTION PAPERS. .... I M WAITING FOR UR COMMENTS..........

September 22, 2013 by
SpiceJet pilots to double as engineers at smaller airports                                                                     Spicejet fliers could be travelling in a poorly serviced plane or with a fatigued pilot. The no-frill airline has begun using its Boeing B737 fleet cockpit crew as engineers at smaller airports. One out of every five domestic fliers travels by the airline. Pilots are faced with additional pressure to maintain a 30-minute turnaround time for the next flight despite the dual role. “An aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) is supposed to check around 75 items during a stopover of about 20 minutes,” said a retired Boeing commander requesting anonymity. The AME also refuels an aircraft, which takes about 10 minutes.     Senior pilots said it’s “humanly impossible” to perform both roles within 30 minutes because pilots have to perform other duties such a pre-flight briefing, checking trim and load sheets that contain the weight distribution on a plane. “Shortcuts are bound to be taken, which means many unfit planes could be flying,” said another senior pilot. The airline introduced the move in April and began training pilots about two months ago. An internal mail dated April 23 accessed by HT stated that the move was meant to avoid flying AMEs to airports without engineering support. Worse, the airline backed the move by citing a Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) rule applicable during emergencies. “If a flight gets diverted to a small airfield without engineering support, a certified pilot could perform the basic check but it cannot be a routine policy,” said RK Khanna, deputy director general, DGCA (western region).   On Thursday the Spicejet spokesperson said the airline would respond in a day but didn’t revert till the time of going to press.

March 14, 2013 by
The Indian Government persists with its ban, disallowing Emirates Airbus A380 aircraft to serve in India.Overseas carriers flying aircraft bigger than the Boeing 747 are not permitted to service the country.India’s concerns that travellers will desert local carriers in favour of larger aircraft operators, such as Emirates’ A380 fleet, remain prevalent since the ban was enforced in May 2008, Air Transport World reported.“This is ridiculous because we have many travelers via Dubai to points which you cannot reach from India.“We should have at least five or six additional points in India - Emirates has suggested this to the Indian government,” Emirates president Tim Clark said.Upcoming bilateral discussions between India and the United Arab Emirates aim to improve the situation.“We have seen in the last four years that Indian carriers have grown business; Kingfisher is gone from the scene,” Mr Clark said.Source = e-Travel  

August 30, 2012 by
   Why I Love Working On Aircraft I think  it's time to focus on the positives of our job. Too often we get caught up in the industry and the politics of the airlines that we work for. I know a lot of guys at work who no longer enjoy what they do and that is really too bad.When I know I have to go to work I do not get the sense of dread that it appears some people do. I truly enjoy working on planes and I enjoy (for the most part) the people I work with. My vision is still blurred by the "next new plane" that some company is building, and for the most part I still enjoy learning about new and different ways to fix my beautiful old 737s or A320I think that one of the things I find fascinating about our line of work is the multitude of different ways in which different AME's will attack similar problems. One guy will do what he has learned will work and another guy/gal will go another route ultimately arriving at the same destination. I know that the Regulatory authority does not believe in this and thinks that there is only "one way" to fix any problem on our airplanes but from my experience I have to say that it is just not true. The good mechanics, and I mean the really good ones, have honed their skill over the years and know exactly how they want to approach issues that come up on the plane. This process is also good because often the different perspective of our fellow mechanics is just what it takes to get a problem fixed. I can't tell you how many times I have been stuck on a broke plane, running through BITE tests, chasing wires, hitting things with hammers, cussing, just doing battle, only to have a guy/gal stop by and say "hey have you tried _____?" Sure enough that one thing or different view will fix the plane. I think it is an important dynamic which the Regulatory authority does not take into account. When you are the person who offers help and the help actually ends up fixing the problem I kind of feel like a rock star! I also enjoy knowing that the 180 folks sitting in the plane are going to make it to their destination because I was able to fix the plane. There is an ego thing there, sort of a longing to be the hero which comes to the surface when a plane is down hard and you can figure out the problem.You put these first things together with a curiosity on the way things work mix in a little bit of knowledge on the way things break and you have a happy aircraft mechanic/engineer. I know some of you are saying "the way things break?" I have always contended that this job is equal parts knowing how things work and knowing how things break. Think about this: when I am at home and something in my house breaks I can usually fix it. Not because I necessarily know how a washing machine works but rather I know that if no water is getting to point "A" then something downline of that is messed up. I know how things break.After all these years I am still an airplane nerd. I like airshows, air museums, AMEVoice.com, shows about airplanes, books about airplanes, etc. I do not think any of the airline industry will ever make that go way.What sort of things do you like about being a technician/AME? Let me know, now is the time to focus on the things we like about our jobs!

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